How to design album covers

The thing about Information Professionals/Librarians/Whatever is they need to have a diverse skill set. One minute you can be cataloguing books by emotion and the next you can be splitting up a knitter’s circle that has gotten dangerously loud and is frightening the children in the soft book section. You have to be able to adapt.

One of the most lucrative areas that I have found myself working in is designing album covers for bands. Like a lot of things in my life, I got into this by chance.  It started with my capstone project on classifying 1980s cassette covers using the British Catalogue of Music Classification system which I did purely to impress a hot looking library student. I put a lot of work into that.

mixtape-spine-art-00

More importantly, I get insane amounts of money for designing album covers and this helps me to be of benefit to mankind. It is still not enough to keep a book shop open so I have to work like everyone else. I get offered edgey guitar bands which suits me down to the ground. Film scores and experimental jazz I farm out to my friends.

My favourite tool for designing album covers is a Random Flickr Blendr created by John Johnston that he uses for self help book covers. This was originally used for gonzo digital media bootcamp DS106, but like a lot of things on the internet it is only limited by imagination.I give it bonus points for using Flickr cos I love creative commons.

Below are a few of my album covers.

luminosity

Luminosity

multiply

Multiply

hardlight

Hard Light

colorburn

Color burn

colordodge

Color Dodge

 

Advertisements

Blog Audit

It has been three years since I started this blog as part of the Creating Digimedia module in UCD Information & Library course. It was not expecting it to last. This was purely an experiment. I had other blogs before it and other blogs after it for different projects.   At the start it was just a platform where I could put images to see how they changed with different camera settings. It was never meant to be serious and I a definitely had no real interest in taking photographs but somehow it kept going. It allowed me to throw stuff into a draft that I have an interest in and explore it a bit more without any sort of pressure. Looking back over the years I realise that blogs work in a very strange way for me. I dump text in the editor. While I wonder what direction I am going to take with it, I wander off to look for images. Often the images will take the text and give it a direction. Sometimes I might be looking for an image for something else but I will just know that It belongs to one of these posts. It is odd. Somehow this mix of text and images does something for me. I don’t work like this in any other area.

14767276165_e11a8ec816_b

Recently I signed up for Blogging 201, the WordPress Blogging University which is designed to focus and grow blogs. I had a few years of content and I was able to look back over it and see what it could tell me. The first thing I discovered was that I use this blog to explore information and to clarify my own thoughts. From this I began to have a look at my blogging goals. This is something I was wary of because it has operated very organically (which means that I have just done whatever I felt like doing). It turns out that my goal is to just explore whatever I fancy and have fun doing it. Identifying that allowed me to have a think about what sort of stuff (technical term for information) I wanted to look at. This gave me the bones of an editorial calendar for the future.

Looking at the sort of content that I had covered and the sort of issues that interested me in the future gave me a lens through which to look at the design of the blog. I had never given this any kind of real thought before. So I had a think about the intent of the blog and how the design matched it, or did not match it. Although the title of the blog had been Information Agent as long as I could remember, the original impetus for it was actually an information explorer. The theme I had originally on this blog did not reflect that at all though so I played around with the look until I got something I liked.

14598661787_9518642803_z(1)

I changed themes, had a look at more appropriate fonts and changed the background images. I  had not given any thought to categorising my blog posts and once I did this I decided to create widgets for them so they would match the overall look. As usual, I took images from Creative Commons in Flickr, transformed them with Gimp and gave them titles. I updated my about page. I even considered deleting my purpose page but after checking the stats for 2014, I realised that some people clicked on it. Digging around in the stats showed me other areas that I had never given any thought to such as the comments prompts, email and rss subscriptions. These had been set at default but there was no reason why they could not be adapted to suit the concept behind the blog. Basically, I tried to be more consistent with the visual consistency as this helps create trust for a reader. Along with enabling the related posts feature I also decided to create a new page where I could put my favourite old posts posts. This is my blog after all.

2880740408_e291165e21_o

 

The stats also showed me an interesting story.  In 2013 it was all about digital storytelling. In 2014 it was all about digital marketing. I wonder what 2015 will be about?